has ORIGINAL VERSION: According to Johnston and Robins (1997), there are three basic assumptions of social constructivism that are related with identity and human development. The first, as an active receptor of external influence, person is actively involved in a constant interaction with the world by shaping its own developmental stage. In this sense, human development is regarded as dynamic process rather than static structure within social contexts. The second, social interaction which emphasizes mutuality, cooperation, communication plays a vital role in the production of mental capacities as foundations for human development. The third, language and other cultural semiotic systems which have the accumulated knowledge of previous generations serve as a cultural mediating tool of individual behavior. In this sense, social constructivism emphasizes human development as a social artifact rather than natural process within the framework of postmodern philosophy (Stetsenko and Arievitch ,1997). That is, social constructivism is theoretical approaches aimed at understanding and interpreting the subject’s perceptions and the meanings they construct (Lincoln, Lynham, & Gubam, 2011).

 

EDITED VERSION: Johnston and Robins (1997) outlined three basic assumptions of social constructivism as it relates to identity and human development. First, as active receptors of external influence, individuals shape their own development through constant interaction with the world, making human development a dynamic process rather than static structure within social contexts. Second, social interaction, which emphasizes mutuality, cooperation, and communication, plays a vital role in the production of mental capacities and provides a foundation for human development. Finally, language and other cultural semiotic systems, which contain the accumulated knowledge of previous generations, serve as culture-based mediating tools for individual behavior.These assumptions, which are consistent with postmodern philosophy (Stetsenko and Arievitch ,1997), reflect the emphasis in social constructivism on human development as a social artifact rather than a natural process. Accordingly, this theoretical approach has led researchers to focus on understanding and interpreting the perceptions of individuals and the meanings they construct (Lincoln, Lynham, & Gubam, 2011).

I believe in communication;

books communicate ideas and

make bridges between people.

                            Jeanette Winterson